The first look at the Hôtel de la Marine renovation in Paris

Since the 18th century, the Hôtel de la Marine has looked out from its beautiful neo-classical facade onto Paris' Place de la Concorde. After its renovations finish in 2020, the magnificent mansion's heritage, symbolizing French art de vivre, will finally be open to visitors. Follow along for a sneak peek into a soon-to-be-unmissable Parisian landmark.

A ceremonial building, sumptuous scenography marrying technology and heritage: the Hôtel de la Marine. The free-access court of honor will be illuminated into a light garden thanks to hundreds of LED lights embedded into the pavement as a counterpoint to the flourishes of yesteryear.

Maritime

The maritime symbols and scenes gracing the Honor Staircase recall the Hôtel's second life. Since the French Revolution, the Navy Minister installed his office in a part of the building that was once used for furniture storage.

Mirror Cabinet

Both honoring the building's original look and creating an immersive museography, visitors will be welcomed into the lives of the stewarts that inspired these apartments. For example, the Cabinet of Mirrors' putti (cupids) were commissioned by the second stewart who didn't want the more heroic scenes of the first!

Crystal and glass

The Stewart's Courtyard will be the first stop for audio-guided tours (offered in 8 languages). Thea dazzling dome is made of laminated glass and mirrors that glitter like crystal to approximate the building's original size.

The loggia

Overhanging the Place de la Concorde, the Hôtel's loggia has born witness to history, from the execution of Louis XVI in the square in 1793 to the arrival of the famous obelisk in 1836. On July 14, 1989, French heads of state and world leaders gathered here to watch the parade for the Bicentennial of the French Revolution, organized by artist Jean-Paul Goude.

The loggia

Overhanging the Place de la Concorde, the Hôtel's loggia has born witness to history, from the execution of Louis XVI in the square in 1793 to the arrival of the famous obelisk in 1836. On July 14, 1989, French heads of state and world leaders gathered here to watch the parade for the Bicentennial of the French Revolution, organized by artist Jean-Paul Goude.

Prestige

Guardian of a valuable place and its priceless treasure, the stewart was granted apartments that matched his prestige. An enormous amount of effort and research went into locating the precious and rare aspects this level, including the staircase, for which the faux marble and cut stones were reconstructed.

Place de la Concorde

Sixty-four meters (201 feet) long and 17 meters (15 feet) high: the monumental edifice is opening its 6,200 m2 (66730 ft2) to the public. Originally ornamental, the building imagined by Louis XV's architect has become a symbol of the French navy. But, it's even moreso the guards of the furniture stores of the Crown that this immaculate renovation by the Centre des Monuments Nationaux honors. Behind the facade, seen here from the Fontaine des Fleuves on the Place de la Concorde, the Hôtel de la Marine is about to unveil its renewed finery.